Gressenhall Manor; 1189-1925; Gressenhall, Norfolk

Identity area

Type of entity

Corporate body

Authorized form of name

Gressenhall Manor; 1189-1925; Gressenhall, Norfolk

Parallel form(s) of name

Standardized form(s) of name according to other rules

Other form(s) of name

  • Gresenhall North Soken
  • Gresenhall South Soken

Identifiers for corporate bodies

Description area

Dates of existence

1189-1925

History

Richard son of Richard Folyot died in possession holding of John de Warrene, Earl of Surrey and Sussex, 1344-5, heirs his sisters Marjery and Margaret [IPM 6/618]. At an inquisition taken in 1488, Hugh Hastings was found to have been in possession of the manor, holding it of the king's duchy of Lancaster. John was his son and heir [IPM H7 1/188].\r\nOwned by the L'Estrange family of Hunstanton Hall: court books record first court of Elizabeth L'Estrange in 1570. The executors of Nicholas L'Estrange hold the court in 1595. Sir Hamon L'Estrange occurs as lord 1640, 1649; Dame Anne, relict of Sir Nicholas L'Estrange, in 1656. The manor was settled on Elizabeth Calthorpe in 1721. Under her will it came to Thomas L'Estrange in 1747. After his death in 1751 it passed to Sir Henry L'Estrange and in 1783 to Sir Edward Astley who sold it to John Hill of Wells. [source; Carthew's History of Launditch (1897)].\r\nJohn Hill is named in the Inclosure Act of 1811 as 'Lord of the several manors of Gressenhall on the Part of North Soken, Gressenhall on the Part of South Soken, and Rougholme' [NRO, NRS 15668].\r\nJ.D.H. Hill, Esq., is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845).\r\nThe executors of J.D.H. Hill are given as lords of the manor in White's Trade Directory, 1883.\r\nThe manor was divided into North Soken and South Soken: that part later called South Soken is sometimes simply called Gressenhall in 15th century rolls [eg, NRO ING 124, 126]. By the 19th century, they are sometimes described as two separate manors, especially in rentals [NRO, MC 2381/1: MC 2056/24].\r\nThe two elements of 'North Soken' and 'South Soken'are sometimes treated almost as two manors.

Places

Gressenhall, Norfolk

Legal status

Functions, occupations and activities

Mandates/sources of authority

Rentals show that North Soken extended into the parishes of Stanfield, Horningtoft, Brisley, East Bilney and Beetley, all to the north of the parish of Gressenhall. South Soken extended into the neighbouring parishes of Hoe, Scarning, Great Bittering and Great Fransham (lands of Necton feoffees only in the last).

Internal structures/genealogy

Blomefield says that if a tenant was admitted to lands within one soke he paid a fine of 5 shillings, if the land was in both sokes he paid 10 shillings.

General context

Relationships area

Access points area

Occupations

Control area

Authority record identifier

GB/153/NM/3714

Institution identifier

Rules and/or conventions used

Status

Catalogued

Level of detail

Minimal

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

Created on: 22/01/2003 by Droip

Language(s)

Script(s)

Sources

F. Blomefield, 'An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk' (11 vols, London, 1805-1810)\r\nIPM Inquisitions Post Mortem\r\nW. White, 'History, Gazetteer, and Directory

Maintenance notes

Proven MDR
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