Sub-series - Documents relating to Norfolk Manors

Identity area

Reference code

Title

Documents relating to Norfolk Manors

Date(s)

  • 1384-1928 (Creation)

Level of description

Sub-series

Extent and medium

32 pieces

Context area

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

In the mid-sixteenth century, the owners of the manors of Erpingham, Colby, Banningham, Felbrigg, Aylmerton, (Sir Edmond Wyndham held all but the first of these manors), payed rents to Hanworth manor, as did Hales Hall in Metton, described as a tenement, not as a manor. Aylmerton descended through the Windham family; William Windham was lord in 1675, Ash Windham in 1742, William Wymondham died in possession in 1761. Admiral William Windham is named as lord of the manor of Aylmerton in the Inclosure Award of 1823 [NRO, C/Sca 2/112].\r\nRobert William Ketton, Esq., given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1883) and was lord in the early twentieth century.\r\nLast transaction dated: 1901; lord of the manor (with Gresham): Robert William Ketton; Steward: Rackham and Sayer [TNA, HMC 5/6].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

In the mid-sixteenth century, the owners of the manors of Erpingham, Colby, Banningham, Felbrigg, Aylmerton, (Sir Edmond Wyndham holds all but the first of these manors), pay rents to Hanworth manor, as does Hales Hall in Metton, here described as a tenement, not as a manor.\r\nFrederica Windham, widow, is named as lady of the manor in the Inclosure Act for Erpingham, Colby, Banningham and Ingworth of 1818 [NRO, MC 88/7/2].\r\nW.H. Windham, Esq., is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845).\r\nW.F. Windham, Esq., given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1883).

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

An Inquisition post mortem held in 1331found that Robert, son of John de Thorp, had died in possession of the 'manor of Bernyngham'; the heir was his son John. The manor was held by Eustace de Bernyngham [IPM 1:7/296]. The manor was later owned by the Windham family: William Windham was lord in 1760. It descended through the family; the trustees of the late W.H. Windham, Esq. are given as lords of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1883).

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Early court rolls [NRO, WKC 2/49-52], which include the leet, are ascribed simply to Beckham: Robert de Mautby is lord in 1293; William and Gregory de Felmingham in the first half of the fourteenth century; Walter de Brethenham, knight, Thomas de Swathyngg and Thomas Clere in 1345. \r\nInquisitions post mortem provide information about the tenant-in-chief of the manor: an inquisition of 1342-3 says the manor of Beckham was held by Gregory de Felmingham and is now divided between six heirs and purchasers: Robert Brian; Christiana, James and Alice Whitwell; James Ruthwys; Oliver atte Mowe and his wife Ela [IPM 1:6/430]. Christina, wife of Geoffrey Aleyns died in possession 1392; heir Cecily, daughter of Robert Aleyns and now wife of Edward Dudaunt [IPM 1:18/875]. John Pigeon was lord in 1562.\r\nW.H. Windham, Esq., is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845). The trustees of the late W.H. Windham, Esq., are given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1883). \r\nFor further history of the manor to the early eighteenth century, see F. Blomefield, 'An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk' (11 vols, London, 1805-10).\r\n

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

According to Blomefield, this manor was granted to Abraham Felmingham by Henry II, passing to his heir Isaac and was held by the Felminghams until Gregory Felmingham died without heir in 1320. The manor was then split between his five sisters. In 1342 James Rightways, the son of one of the sisters, was lord of the manor. The manor appears to have reverted to the Crown by the late fourteenth century; the first court of the King was 1392/93. The first court and leet of Edward Durdant and Cecilia his wife was in 1406, and after this William Gunnoe and Cecilia his wife held court [NRO, WKC 2/55]. Cecilia Gunmore died seized of the manor and her son Simon was lord in 1465, thereafter it passed to Richard Gone, or Gunnor, who held his first court in 1500. Robert Griggs was given licence to alien the manor to Edmund Windham in 1533, who in turn conveyed it to Thomas Pigeon in 1546. An inquisition post mortem in 1558 found Thomas Pigeon to have been the lord and the manor remained with the Pigeons until the early seventeenth century when it was aliened to Robert Fielding and William Paine in 1603 and then in 1618 Thomas Derham conveyed it to Sir Samuel Town. Fielding, Paine and Town all also held the manor of East Beckham Marriots.
William Windham held his first court in 1662 and the manor remained in that family, with East Beckham Marriots, into the twentieth century.

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Thomas Anson occurs as lord in 1770 [NRO, STA 9].\r\nThe lords of the manor are given in a court book [NRO NRS 16640] as follows: William Repton, gent. (1827); George Hanley Repton, Esq., and Right Hon. Lady Elizabeth Repton, his wife (1833), who are named as lords in the Inclosure Act of 1839 [C/Sca 2/21]; Miss Elizabeth Repton (1860); Thomas Copeman, Esq. (1862); William Martin Hazard, Esq. (1869); George Thalcher (1893, still lord in 1900).\r\nThe representatives of W.H. Scott Esq. are given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory, 1883.\r\nLast transaction dated: ?; lord of the manor: ?; Steward: ? [TNA, HMC 5/6].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

All or part of the manor was held of Duchy of Lancaster. John de Warenna died in possession, holding of the Earl of Lancaster, 1347-8; his heir was Richard, Earl of Arundel [IPM 1:9/54]. White's Trade Directory gives the lordship as Duchy of Lancaster (1845). The MAF's list of known manors, compiled in 1925, does not record any information regarding the lord or steward; the last transaction is given as 1895 [TNA, HMC 5/6].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

The manor was owned by Beeston priory until the Dissolution, when it was conveyed to Sir Edmund Wyndham and Gyles Seafoule in 1546. It was owned by Thomas Blofield in 1619 and sold by his grandson to Thomas Plumstead and Edward Cooke. In the nineteenth century it was owned by Thomas Woodrow who sold it to James Barnham and Edmund Jewell. The MAF's list of known manors, compiled in 1925, does not record any information regarding the lord or steward; the last transaction is given as 1895 [TNA, HMC 5/6].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Owned by the Ufford family in the 14th cent, later by the Arnolds one of who brought it into the Windham family when she married Sir George Windham in the mid 17th century, after which it was sometimes known as Windhams (for example in NRO, RYE 79). It passed by marriage into the family of the Earl of Listowel, c 1837. In 1852 it was bought by Benjamin Bond Cabbell of Cromer Hall. There was a dispute about the boundary between Cromer Gunners and Cromer Uffords held before Norwich Asizes in 1768: each claimed right of wreck so the point at issue was where along the Cromer coastline the boundary lay.

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Lord Wodehouse is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845).\r\nEarl of Kimberley is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory, 1883.\r\nAccording to the Inland Revenue list of 1925, the Earl of Kimberley was lord and Daynes, Son and Keefe the stewards. \r\nFor further history of the manor to the early eighteenth century, see F. Blomefield, 'An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk' (11 vols, London, 1805-10).

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

William Windham is named as lord in the Inclosure Act of 1826 [NRO, C/Sca 2/93].
W.H. Windham is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845). W.F. Windham is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory, 1883. The lordship was sold by the Earl of Stradbroke in 1990 (Eastern Daily Press 13, 20 April 1990).

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

The manor was owned successively by the Felbrigg, Windham and, from 1862, Ketton families. In the mid-sixteenth century, the owners of the manors of Erpingham, Colby, Banningham, Felbrigg, Aylmerton, (Sir Edmond Wyndham holds all but the first of these manors), pay rents to Hanworth manor. \r\nWilliam Windham is named as lord of the manor in the Inclosure Award of 1823 [NRO, C/Sca 2/112].\r\nWilliam Howe Windham, Esq. of Felbrigg Hall, is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845). \r\nLast transaction dated: 1887; lord of the manor: Robert William Ketton; Steward: J.B. Coaks [TNA, HMC 5/6]. \r\nFor further history of the manor to the early eighteenth century, see F. Blomefield, 'An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk' (11 vols, London, 1805-10).\r\n

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Margery, late wife of Edmund Bacon, holding of the Duke of Lancaster, died in possession 1349-50; no heir named [IPM 9/155]. Edmund Bacon, holding of the Earl of Arundel, died in 1353; Margery, married to William son of John Molyns, was heir [IPM 10/82]. At an inquisition taken in 1356, Edmund Bacon and Margery his wife were found to hold the manor, of the heirs of John de Warrene, late Earl of Surrey [IPM 10/316]. William de Molyns died in possession of 'Cresham', holding of the Earl of Arundel as of the Honour of Castleacre, 1380-1; heir Richard de Molyns [IPM 15/392]. This apparent discrepancy between the Earl of Arundel and Duke of Lancaster holding the manor is examined in Bryant; it appears that both held a moiety of the manor.\r\nIn 1396 Thomas Chaucer, son of Geoffrey, was lord, and he sold the manor in 1429 to William Paston, Esq. of Paston.\r\nWilliam Paston, Earl of Yarmouth, was lord in 1760; the Paston estates being later sold to Lord Anson. The manor is called Gresham and Aylmerton by 1770, when Thomas Anson occurs as lord [NRO, STA 9] (this is a separate manor from the manor simply called Aylmerton, both manors appearing on the Inclosure Map of 1823 [C/Sca 2/112]).\r\nWilliam Repton is named in the Inclosure Award of 1823 as lord of the manor of Gresham and Aylmerton [C/Sca 2/112].\r\nSubsequently passed into the Ketton family: Robert William Ketton of Felbrigg Hall was lord in the early 20th cent. [source: Bryant's Norfolk Churches] Although G.S. Repton is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845).\r\nR.W. Ketton, Esq., is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory, 1883.\r\nLast transaction dated: 1901; lord of the manor (with Aylmerton): Robert William Ketton; Steward: Rackham and Sayer [TNA, HMC 5/6].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Held by Sir Roger de Hales of Roger Bigot, temp Edward I, and descended through the Hales family, and then to Roger de Walesham in 1372; he had married the widow of Sir John de Hales. John Sampson was lord in right of his wife, 1433. Alianore Jenney, widow of Sir William Jenny ordered the sale of the manor under the terms of her will, 1494. The Heydons family of Baconsthorpe were lords in the early 16th cent, selling the manor to Roger Rugge, alderman of Norwich in 1544. It descended to Thomas Rugge who sold it to Sir Thomas Herne in 1618. Descended through the Herne family: Clement Herne occurs as lord in 1690 and Everard Herne in 1762. Later passed to the Ketton family of Felbrigg Hall. [source: Bryant's Norfolk Churches]
In the mid-16th cent, the owners of the manors of Erpingham, Colby, Banningham, Felbrigg, Aylmerton, (Sir Edmond Wyndham holds all but the first of these manors), pay rents to Hanworth manor, as does Hales Hall in Metton, then described as a tenement, not as a manor.
Admiral William Windham is named as lord in the Inclosure Award of 1823 [NRO, C/Sca 2/112].
Last transaction dated: 1862; lord of the manor: George Danby Palmer; Steward: James Copeman [TNA, HMC 5/6].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Honour of Clare. Owned succesively by the Ingworth and Baldwin families in the 13th cent, passing by marriage to Nicholas Repps. In 1314 Henry de Colby held it of the Honour of Clare. The Colby family sold it to George Felbrigge in about 1390 and the manor descended through this family and its successor the Wyndhams. Frederica Windham, widow, is named as lady of the manor in the Inclosure Act for Erpingham, Colby, Banningham and Ingworth of 1818 [NRO, MC 88/7/2],\r\nIt was sold to Captain Reginald Cossley Batt in the early 20th cent [source Bryant's Norfolk Churches]. The title of lord was sold by Batt's grandson in c1990.

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

A writ of 1437 allowed William Marryot to hold the manor [NRO, WKC 1/42], and following his death in 1446 a suit regarding ownership of the manor was raised between Sir William Paston and Edmund Winter. In 1476 Roger Townsend leased the manor to Simon Gunnore for seven years; it was leased by Sir William Paston to Thomas Pigeon in 1532 for 40 years and then, in 1577 conveyed to feoffees, and then from them to Thomas Gibson in 1600 [deeds NRO, WKC 1/43]. \r\nThe manor was called Pastons in the sixteenth century. William Paston held his first court with Brigitte his wife in 1540. Robert Felding and William Payne held their first court in 1616; Samuel Town in 1619. John Windham, Esq., occurs as lord in 1658 and from then on the manor remained in the family, with East Beckham Isaack's manor.\r\n

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

The manor of Morley Hall is not mentioned in the Sheringham Inclosure Act of 1809 [NRO, C/Sca 2/252].\r\nThe Countess Listowel is given as lady of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845).\r\nLast transaction dated: 1898; lords of the manor: Margaret B. Cabbell, widow, and Edward E. Greenwell (as trustee); Steward: F.W.H. Keith [TNA, HMC 5/6].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Half of the manors of Metton and Parnow granted by William son of Sarre de Pyrrowe to Robert de Swyllington 1289-90 [Rye, Calendar of Norfolk Feet of Fines]
Owned by the Carbonell family in the early 15th cent, Robert Lyston was lord in 1457, on his death in 1484 succeeded by his widow Isabel. Isabel died in 1494 leaving her five daughters as joint heiresses. The IPM states that she held the manor of the Eleanor, Duchess of Norfolk [IPM H7 1/295]. Owned by Sir Thomas Bedingfeld of Oxborough by 1538 when he sold it to Edward Windham: it then descended through the Windham family and their successors the Kettons.[source: Bryant's Norfolk Churches]
Admiral William Windham is named as lord in the Inclosure Award of 1823 [C/Sca 2/112].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

TAKEN FROM BLOMEFIELD: In the 4th of Henry III. a fine was levied between Mary de Merlai, petent in dower, and Richard de Felbrigg tenant, of the 3d part of 2 carucates of land in Felbrig, and 40s. in land in this town, with which William de Felbrigg, (son and heir of Richard,) late husband of the said Mary, endowed her, with the consent of his father; and Richard grants the rents and services of several persons, and 13 acres of land in Runton, which Jeffrey le Neve held, together with the said Jeffrey, and his posterity, to Mary and her heirs for ever, paying a rent; and she released all her right in the residue of the inheritance. In the 24th of Henry III. Nigel de London, and Clementia his wife, convey to John de Merlai the 5th part of the advowson of the church of Runton, and lands there, to be held of Nigel and Clementia, and her heirs.
On the death of Richard de Felbrigg, his inheritance came to his daughter and heir, Maud, who married Sir Simon le Bigot, 3d son of Hugh Bigot Earl of Norfolk; and in the 56th of Henry III. it was agreed between the said Maud, and her son Roger, and Roger the prior of Beeston, that the prior and they should present alternately to this church.
In this family it continued till the death of Sir Simon Felbrigg, in 1443; after this, it was sold by Tho. Lord Scales, one of his trustees, to John Wymondham, Esq. as may be seen in Felbrigg, and it remains in the descendants of the said John; Ash Wymondham, Esq. being late lord in 1740, and patron, as was his son, William Wymondham, Esq. who died in 1761, leaving his son and heir a minor.
From: 'North Erpingham Hundred: Ruton', An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: volume 8, pp. 159-161. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=78432&strquery=runton Date accessed: 15 July 2013.
WIlliam Windham is named as lord on the Inclosure Award of 1823 [NRO, C/Sca 2/112].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

W.H. Windham, Esq., is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845).\r\nLast transaction dated: 1895; lord of the manor: ?; Steward: ? [TNA, HMC 5/6].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Henry de Grey died in possession 1308-9, heir his son Sir Richard de Grey [IPM 5/116]: Richard is named as lord in the Nomina Villarum of 1316. IPM of 1336: Robert de Grey died in possession; heir his son John [IPM 7/683]. At an inquisition held in 1362, Sir Richard Willoughby the elder was found to have been in possession of the manor, held of the barony of Giffard. Richard was his son and heir [IPM 11/347]. William, the brother of Thomas, late Earl of Stafford, died in possession, 1398-9; heir his brother Edmund [IPM 17/1276]. Ralph Bassett died in possession, 1390-1; heir Thomas, Earl of Stafford [IPM 16/963].\r\nThomas, Earl of Stafford, died in possession of two thirds of the manor, with reversion on the other third, 1402; heir his son Humphrey The IPM of 1403 records that Edmund Earl of Stafford had granted the manor to Edmund, Bishop of Exeter and others 'long before death' [IPM 18/813].\r\nJoan widow of Richard Bassett died in possession of a third part of the manor as dower, 1402; heir Edmund, Earl of Stafford [IPM 18/782].\r\nCook Flower is named as lord of the manor of Sheringham in the Inclosure Act of 1809 [NRO, C/Sca 2/252]\r\nHenry Ramey Upcher, Esq., JP, DL, is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory, 1883.

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

John Damme was lord in 1462, his son Simon succeeded and died lord in 1498, Thomas Damme was lord in 1547. In the early 17th cent, the manor passed to the Blofield family, and in 1740 from them to the Windhams, through which family it descended [source: Bryant's Norfolk Churches].\r\nAdmiral William Windham is named as lord in the Inclosure Award of 1823 [NRO, C/Sca 2/112].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Peter Roscelyn is named as lord in the Nomina Villarum of 1316.\r\nJohnathan Farrow, Esq., is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845).\r\nJonathan Farrow is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory, 1883.

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

The manor, along with Hackford, Ingworth, Metton Parnowhall and Duffhouse was conveyed by Edmund Windham to Roger Townshend et al., trustees to the use of his wife Susanna, daughter of Townshend in 1542 [NRO, WKC 3/5].
TAKEN FROM BLOMEFIELD: At the survey, Coleby was a berewic, belonged to Cawston, (fn. 3) (see p. 254,) and the whole continued with that, till William de Burgh severed it by granting half the town, and half the advowson from Cawston, which in 1199 Robert de Colbi held, with Warine de Coleby, and Simon his brothers; and in 1221 Reiner de Burgh granted the other part and moiety of the advowson, to Hugh Bigod Earl of Norfolk. In 1274 the Earl of Norfolk had a common gallows in Colby, free-warren, view of frankpledge, and of assize bread and ale, and infangthef, here and in Hanworth; and in 1285 all these liberties were allowed to Roger Bigod Earl of Norfolk, as a member of his manor of Hanworth, to which his part and manor of Colby was then joined, and it continued in the Howards till Sir John Howard, Knt. afterwards Duke of Norfolk, on marrying his daughter Margaret to John Windham, conveyed this manor to that family, and it hath passed in it ever since, as the manor of Felbrigge, William Windham of Felbrigge, Esq. being now lord.
The Colbys' manor here, called Oldstead-hall, descended in that family from Robert de Colebi, who inherited it by release of Warine and Simon his brothers, to Hugh de Colebi and Margaret his wife, daughter of William Frank of Felmingham, and from them to their son, Henry de Coleby, who had a charter for freewarren, as at p. 367, and from that time it passed with Ingworth manor, (to which I refer you,) till 1387, and then it was settled by Sir William Phelip, Knt. and Julian his wife, on Sir Simon Fellbrigge, Knt. for the life of Julian. In 1594 it belonged to Sir George Carew, Knt. and Thomas Hitchcock, and in 1598 John Smith and Stephen Drury, Gent. settled it on Martin Fountain, Gent. and John Dodman.
From: 'Hundred of South Erpingham: Colby', An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: volume 6 (1807), pp. 423-426. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=78273&strquery=town+wind Date accessed: 09 August 2013.

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

TAKEN FROM BLOMEFIELD: The manor called Uphall, had its first rise in the time of Samson Abbot of Bury, who first infeoffed Thomas, son of John of Tifteshall, in it; and soon after it came to Adam of Tifteshall, Kat from him to John his son; and in 1266, William of Uphall of Tifteshall was lord. In 1285, it was in Thomas, son of John of Tifteshall of Uphall, who left it, about 1290, to Robert of Uphall, his son; he quite left off the sirname of Tifteshall: in 1292, he gave it to Isabel de Bokland, of Hergham, by the name of Uphall Manor, and in that year the said Robert and Isabel, jointly with Maud, widow of Robert, son of Thomas of Uphall, daughter of Isabel de Bokland, released all their right to Sir John Thorp, and William their son, in this manor. In 1294, Robert, son of Sir John de Ayshewellethorp, and Maud his wife, granted to Robert Carleford of Shotesham, this manor, in exchange for the said Robert's manor of Nelonde; and afterwards the said Robert de Carleford released this manor again to Sir Robert de Thorp aforesaid, and Maud his wife. In 1304, it was settled on John de Thorp, and Alice his wife; he died in 1323, and then held it of the Abbot at 5s. per annum, it being then valued at 3l. 5s. 8d. It seems to continue in this family till it was sold to Sir Edward Jenney's father, for so the said Edward declares in his will, in 1522, when he gave it to his brother, and the next heir male; from the Jenneys it came to the Crown, and was granted in the 24th Henry VIII. to the Duke of Norfolk, who afterwards conveyed it to Edward White of Totsall, to be held of the manor of Forncet, by knight's service; his son, George White, sold it to John Cornwaleys, Esq.; and so it fell into the great manor; it extended at that time into Dickleburgh, Shimpling, Moulton, Pulham, Gissing, and Watton.
Several lands settled for obits, and other superstitious uses, were seized in 1547, and were granted to Thomas Wodehouse, Gent. and his heirs, to be held in soccage of the King's manor of Broke.
The Customs of the Manor are these; the fine is at the lord's will; the copyhold descends to the eldest son: they cannot waste their copyhold-houses, nor fell timber without license.
In 1266, there was an extent made of this manor, at which time the copyholders of Titshall and Shimpling, if the lord was at Bury, were obliged to carry two parts of the Abbot's provision, and the men of Dickleburgh and Semere,the other third part; the lord had then a large park, and a sneid or sneth fenced round, which was repaired by the tenants yearly; William de Uphall held this manor by the payment of 4s. 2d. per annum, and 8d. a year to the Abbot, to be free from suit of the hundred court, for which freedom the Abbot paid 5s. a year for the whole town. Galfry de Bosco and his partners, and Walter Fitz-Roger and the homages of John Fitz-Jeffery, and of John of Uphall, and of Hubert de Schimpling, and the homages of the Abbot in Schimpling, and Ivo the chaplain and his homagers, and the homage of master Anseline, and Hubert de Shimpling and his parceners, (all which held free tenements or small manors under the Abbot,) were to do suit to the Abbot's court, and to plough and cart, with all the cattle they had, for the lord, and were to pay a third part of the Abbot's general aid for Titshall and Shimpling, and to find a third part of the lord's wine, and carry it to Palgrave bridge; and to fence in the park, sneid, and stack-yards, and repair them yearly. These free tenements being first granted by the Abbots, to be held of their chief manor upon these conditions.
From: 'Hundred of Diss: Titshall', An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: volume 1 (1805), pp. 205-212. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=77109&strquery=nether Date accessed: 17 July 2013.
Benjamin Barber is named in the Inclosure Act of 1809 as lord of the manor of Toft Overhall and Netherhall and the manor of Thurlton Banyards [C/Sca 2/295].
The manor was put up for sale in 1841, as one lot together with Thurlton Banyards and contained 286 acres of land [NRO, acc Cozens-Hardy 21/3/75].

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

For details of privileges belonging to tenants of the Duchy see Aylsham Lancaster.

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

The property of Norwich cathedral priory; the manor was farmed by John Milicent at the point of the peasant uprisings in 1381. The manor passed to Norwich Dean and Chapter at the Dissolution of the monastic house and foundation of the Cathedral chapter, 1538; retained by the Crown at the refoundation, 1547; \r\nJohn, Lord Wodehouse is named as lord in the Wicklewood Inclosure Award of 1808 [NRO, C/Sca 2/33].\r\nLord Wodehouse is given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory (1845).\r\nThe Earl of Kimberley, given as lord of the manor in White's Trade Directory, 1883.\r\nLast transaction dated: 1895; lord of the manor: Earl of Kimberley; Steward: George Forrester [TNA, HMC 5/6].\r\nAccording to the Inland Revenue list of 1925, the Earl of Kimberley was lord and Daynes, Son and Keefe the stewards.

Name of creator

(1189-1925)

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Name of creator

(1189-1925)

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Name of creator

(1189-1925)

Administrative history

Not known to Blomefield or to Bryant, an estate rather than a manor. It was owned by the Windham family: there are no court records, only bailiff's accounts, estate rather than manorial records.

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a2f74073-6db0-4fd8-9198-334934331e09

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Created 29/10/2004 by Droip. Modified 12/03/2018 by Droip.

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